We’re collecting our favorite books, movies, podcasts, and more. Check back often for new additions.

Podcasts

Soil: The Dirty Climate Solution – How to Save a Planet

Recommended by: Cari Kimball

This podcast explores the racially-complicated history of agriculture and regenerative farming’s implications for climate. Listen here.

The Political Reality of Climate Action – Climate One

Recommended by: Katy Spence

How do elected officials take action to fight climate change in the deeply divided political landscape we’re currently seeing? Listen here.

Should You Buy an Electric Car or Truck? – Money for the Rest of Us

Recommended by: Derf Johnson

What are the pros and cons of owning an electric vehicle (EV) compared with an internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle? Are electric vehicles worth it? Listen here.

Where Are We in the Hydrogen Hype Cycle? – The Interchange

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

The excitement around green hydrogen has grown dramatically in recent years. Will it live up to the hype? Listen here.

The Intelligence of Plants with Robin Wall Kimmerer – On Being

Recommended by: Cari Kimball

As a botanist and member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Robin Wall Kimmerer joins science’s ability to “polish the art of seeing” with her personal, civilizational lineage of listening to plant life and heeding the languages of the natural world. Listen here.

What Are ‘Transformational’ Utilities Doing Right? – The Energy Gang

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

A look at some positive trends guiding the utility sector. What are power providers that are leading the energy transition doing right? Listen here.

Books

All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis – Ayana Elizabeth Johnson

Recommended by: Conor Ploeger

Provocative and illuminating essays from women at the forefront of the climate movement who are harnessing truth, courage, and solutions to lead humanity forward, featuring a shoutout to our own Anne Hedges. Learn more.

The New Climate War – Michael E. Mann

Recommended by: Katy Spence

A renowned climate scientist shows how fossil fuel companies have waged a thirty-year campaign to deflect blame and responsibility and delay action on climate change, and offers a battle plan for how we can save the planet. Learn more.

Last Stand at Rosebud Creek – Michael Parfit

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

The book is about coal. It is about people. It is about power. It is a compelling and quick read. Learn more.

Opportunity, Montana: Big Copper, Bad Water, and the Burial of an American Landscape – Brad Tyer

Recommended by: Melissa Nootz

A memoir-meets-exposé that examines our fraught relationship with the West and our attempts to clean up a toxic environmental legacy. Learn more.

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants – Robin Wall Kimmerer

Recommended by: Melissa Nootz

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these lenses of knowledge together to show that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. Learn more.

Recommended by: Katy Spence

Critically examines the eruption of the environmental justice movement by combining storytelling & case studies from communities around the U.S. that have chosen to stand up against corporate polluters. Learn more.

Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water – Marc Reisner

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

The story of the American West is the story of a relentless quest for a precious resource: water. It is a tale of rivers diverted and dammed, of political corruption and intrigue, of billion-dollar battles over water rights, of ecological and economic disaster. Learn more.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America – Richard Rothstein

Recommended by: Melissa Nootz

The book chronicles the history of many of the US’s racist housing policies and their subsequent impacts on schooling, generational wealth, and environmental injustice issues. It goes on further to demonstrate how policies allowed states and local jurisdictions, and also private authorities like HOAs to pick up the baton and continue segregation practices. It’s a good read for working to expand knowledge on the history of racist policy at all levels of government and in private sectors. Learn more.

The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero – Timothy Egan

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

In this exciting and illuminating work, National Book Award winner Timothy Egan delivers a story, both rollicking and haunting, of one of the most famous Irish Americans of all time. Learn more.

This House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind – Ivan Doig

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

Ivan Doig grew up in the rugged wilderness of western Montana among the sheepherders and denizens of small-town saloons and valley ranches. What he deciphers from his past with piercing clarity is not only a raw sense of land and how it shapes us but also of the ties to our mothers and fathers, to those who love us, and our inextricable connection to those who shaped our values in our search for intimacy, independence, love, and family. Learn more.

Movies

Other Side of the Hill

Recommended by: Anne Hedges

This short film explores the impacts of a changing climate in rural Eastern Oregon – as seen through the eyes of local leaders on the ground. From innovative timber operations in Wallowa County to large scale solar in Lakeview, we amplify the voices of rural communities often left unheard. In a time of unprecedented cultural divide between rural and urban Oregon, we find common ground in an urgency to address a changing landscape. Watch the trailer.

 

Articles

Recommended by: Cari Kimball

A copper mine threatens the iconic Smith River. It will bring jobs and the copper needed for a renewable-energy future, but is it worth the risk to one of the last pristine waterways? Features Derf Johnson. Read here.

Recommended by: Cari Kimball

“The same throwaway culture that disposes our planet, disposes of people too—especially people of color.” Read here.

Recommended by: Derf Johnson

Researchers uncovered stark disparities between white people and minorities across thousands of categories of pollution, including trucks, industry, agriculture and even restaurants. Read here.

Recommended by: Cari Kimball

Instead of attempting to neatly categorize nature, we accept it for what it truly is: complex, paradoxical, and essentially queer. Read here.

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